Tag Archives: Fishing New Hampshire

1-8-16 – Brookie Slam

I hit the road early with a few buddies. We set up shop for the day in shallow water. Mainly less than 6′. The baits were staggered at different depths with the concentration of them being in less than 3′ as the channel is narrow. We hooked up small shiners, half crawlers, and some powerbait.

We were set up around sunrise and the first flag caught us by surprise while we stood around and caught our breath from making sure things were good to go. When the flag popped we all heard the sound and started running. The straws were drawn and I was 3rd in rotation.

The best fishing of the day occurred from sunrise to 10am. We landed a dozen brookies and 2 rainbows. Big fish of the day was also the first fish, a 17.25″ brookie. The highlight of the day was us landing 5 fish in about 20 minutes from one hole that was in a foot of water. We got to watch the fish fighting on the way in as both the water and ice were crystal clear.

I told myself at the beginning of the day I would only keep a fish if it was hooked badly. By the end of the day, I had iced enough for a limit but all of them were hooked nicely in the corner of the mouth. While I went home empty handed, I had enough in the fridge for a meal of perch and crappie.

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7-13-14 – Mystery Lake

Who doesn’t like exploring a new lake? Well on a hot Sunday that was the plan. Crappie were the target and outside of that, we had no idea what the lake would fish like.

I met my buddy Andy at sunrise and we launched the boat shortly after. We started off scanning the bottom with the side imaging. It is a big lake so exploring seemed like the best idea.

We located several sunken trees that were completely vacant of fish. Then we checked out a rocky shoreline thinking that a “bass” pattern might work. Nope. Just rockbass and lots of them! As we worked off the rocky shoreline, a warden approached us. We had a short chat and he told us that they were there but not many people catch them on purpose. Lakes like this can be great because you will have them to yourself but at the same time locating and staying on them year around is a big chore.

We fished just about every type of habit the lake had to offer and we covered about a third of the lake with side imaging. At the end of the day we had nothing great to show for other than checking of a new species on the bucket list. Redbreast sunfish. We caught a lot of them.

While we didn’t complete out goal, we marked some weedbeds on our Navionics for a potential winter trip.

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6-22-14 – Long Day On The Water

With hopes of some walleye willing to bite, a buddy and I were on the water for sunrise. The bite was slow but with enough water to keep us occupied until he had to go to softball late in the afternoon, we figured that we would find something to save the trip. We fished spot to spot that had produced in the past with very limited success.

While the rockbass were willing to bite just about everywhere, it wasn’t until we got in some shallow water that we found some bluegill and perch. Big gills too! Anywhere that there was woody debris in the water with weeds nearby seemed to hold quite a few biters.

After locating several new spots that the panfish were holding up on, we spent the rest of the day scanning the bottom looking for new structure. We marked some new trees and bottom irregularities that looked promising. While this part of the day was just about wrapped up, I had plans to hit the water later that night with Bobby for some trout!

We motored around a good deal of the lake as neither of us had been there before. We never found much promise but after a seeing a few fish in a tight area we anchored up and submerged the Hydro Glow Fishing Lights.

Fishing before the sun set was pointless. It was nearly impossible to keep the small perch off the hook. Once it was dark things changed. Although we didn’t catch a ton of fish, the perch more than doubled in size and the water below us loaded up with smelt. Lake trout were the only trout species we caught even though rainbows were our target. The lakers that we caught were spitting up tons of smelt when we brought them into the boat.

One of the key points from the night was that lakers wanted the bait moving. Maybe only a few inches up and down but constantly. After a few hours of tough fishing we decided to pack it up and make for home. We learned a new body of water and caught a new species at night.

We will be back soon!

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5-12-14 – Sight Fishing Spawning Crappie And Perch

I hit a new body of water today. Not knowing what to expect, I started off using a pattern that worked well for us in this region last year. Basically, I would replicate fishing for smallmouth but with smaller plastics. After launching the boat, the water temperatures looked a tad cold at only 55.5 but I would try none the less.

For quite a while, my smallmouth pattern of fishing humps and large boulder produced nothing but smallmouth. After about two hours of pitiful fishing, I hit a fork in the road. From where my boat sat, it looked like I could stay shallow and keep searching basically what I had been or I could work a quickly dropping shoreline. While I thought the shallow water would be their destination for the day, the deeper water might have more to offer at this point.

As I started drifting the deeper shoreline, I began to see dark silhouettes of fish suspending over 12′ of water. Below them there was a pine tree with a needles still attached. towards the shallower end, hundreds of crappies sat still in every nook and cranny imaginable.

I quickly backed the boat out and got to catching. I found that most of the fish I caught were males but as I started to work deeper the females started to show up. Little by little I pieced together a puzzle that worked well for the next few hours. I had a few spots that were all similar and I could catch them non stop as long as I kept switching colors so they didn’t get too weary. Also the brighter the better. Mostly I used the fireperch color of the “Live” Baby Shad by Lake Fork Trophy Lures.

While the crappie bite was great, I wanted to explore another new body of water so I packed it up and headed out. Hoping to have similar success, I had scouted aerial photos the night before trying to locate some points of interest. As I made my way to my first way point, the anticipation built.

Things didn’t look good when I arrived as the weeds had not yet shown up and the water was already 66.8. Regardless, I putted around catching good numbers of perch and bass of both large and small variates. Things stayed the same for this and just about every other section of water that I searched. While I can’t complain about numbers and size, the species were not what I desired.

In time, I will find them in these locations because I know that they are there but until then, catching perch and bass will have to do!

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12-30-12 – Windy Crappie

We picked one of the worst days to lug our Clam Fish Traps out on the ice. Although they came in handy as a break from the wind, which was consistently blowing in the high teens to low 20’s, the amount of slush and snow on the ice was the real downfall but more on that later. We were on a new body of water looking for deep water crappie. Our eagerness to find fish far outweighed the adverse conditions.

We began out day in about 20 feet of water and it didn’t take long to get on fish. They were cruising on the bottom but willing to chase a few feet up to intercept our baits. The section of the lake we were on was covered by several inches of slush and water so moving from hole to hole was a wet nightmare. Before too long, our pant legs were covered in large balls of ice that hardened in the wind. Luckily for us the fish were biting.

Most of what we were catching were dink perch with the occasional crappie mixed in. Knowing that there was deeper water nearby Bobby grabbed his auger and started to move out. Soon enough we were on the edge of a large 30′ basin that was surrounded by 20′ of water. As we worked the fringe of the drop off, we located random roaming pods of suspended, better sized crappie. When they came through you could pick one or two before they moved out of your hole.

Not knowing the lake, the pattern of the roaming fish caused us a great deal of frustration. After they passed by, we would scatter in all directions to figure our where they went but were never were able to determine where their loop went off to. With a few fish on the ice for dinner, we packed it up to escape the wind and to check the ice at some other spots.

The walk off the pond was when we really started to regret dragging out flip overs out. The wind was in our face and the snow drifts coupled with the slush that kept building up on the bottom made the walk of take twice as long as it did on the way out in the morning. The rest of our day was spent checking spots for the days to come. No safe ice was found but it wasn’t far off!

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